Raspberry Pi Downloads - Software for the Raspberry Pi

What if Bitkey but for Monero

I just learned about bitkey, and boy am I impressed. Like my actual point is that I think a critical fatal flaw in the crypto economy and bitcoin network is the reliance on centralized hardware manfufactures whose proprietary closed garden systems and also of course centralized exchanges. I think it's just a matter of time before Trezor and LedgerNano become targets, or some rouge intelligence agent releases to the darknet some tool to crack them or compromise them.
BitKey is a bootable system image based on Debian containing everything you need to perform highly secure air-gapped Bitcoin transactions. You don't need to install it to a hard drive because it runs live from RAM. You just write the ISO image to a USB drive or burn it to CDROM.
I'm a die hard open source linux open system advocate, and I think that bitkey is the right step in the right direction. And my point being, anyone who's a developer could make some version of their own to be audited by the public community. Eventually we would have a handful of publically trusted builds by different developers, and this could be done for the major cryptos, or any crypto, but especially monero since it barely has hardware support.
But the design of bitkey being an iso image on a cd rom or a usb, set to maximum privacy with two computers and a third device that scans QR codes. (on a side note there are security issues with QR codes, so that is one area for improvement).
I'm trying to imagine a world where people can't get safe devices, can't get hardware wallets, and need an open source alternative to compromised desktops. Obviously something as advanced as a linux OS build spread across three devices for airgapping has a learning curve, but UI can increase over time.
We have to remember there are a lot of tyrants in this world who want the monero and btc network to fail, want the fungibility and privacy and cash like nature fail, want to backdoor everything, they want to know if you're hungry, if you need to take a shit, before you even know, Minority report shit, but sadly unironically, and increasingly so.
Windows is the devil obviously, Apple even more so. We need a world moving towards Linux, RVISC chips, raspberry pis. Even the best intentions of cypherpunk and monero are very very vulnerable without the hardware to back it up. So there really needs to be a move towards this.
submitted by samdane7777 to Monero [link] [comments]

Vertnode - An automated solution for installing Vertcoin node(s) on Single Board Computers

Hello Vertcoin Community,
Eager to contribute to the Vertcoin Community I began creating step by step walkthrough guides on how to get a Vertcoin node up and running on a Raspberry Pi, Raspberry Pi Zero and Intel NUC. Along with information to get a Vertcoin node up and running was also optional steps to install p2pool-vtc.
I decided that while this step by step guide might be helpful to a few, a setup script may prove to be useful to a wider range of people. I have this script to a point where I think it may be productive to share with a bigger audience, for those who are brave and have this hardware sitting around or like to tinker with projects; I invite you to test this setup script if you are interested, if you run into errors any sort of verbose console output of the error proves to be extremely helpful in troubleshooting.
The script was designed to produce a “headless” server... meaning we will not be using a GUI to configure Vertcoin or check to see how things are running. In fact, once the server is set up, you will only interact with it using command line calls over SSH. The idea is to have this full node be simple, low-power, with optimized memory usage and something that “just runs” in your basement, closet, etc.
Why run a headless node on a Single Board Computer?
The idea is to have this full node be simple, low-power, with optimized memory usage and something that “just runs” in your basement, closet, etc.
Required: USB Flash Drive 6GB - 32GB
Please note that the script was designed for Single Board Computers first and looks for an accessible USB Flash Drive to use for storing the blockchain and swap file, as constant writing to a microSD can degrade the health of the microSD.
Supports

Hardware

All of the hardware listed above is hardware that I have personally tested / am testing on myself. The plan is to continue expanding my arsenal of single board computers and continue to add support for more hardware to ensure as much compatibility as possible.
Functionality
It is worth noting that LIT can be ran with multiple configurations, the ones displayed in the Post Installation Report reflect values that run LIT with the Vertcoin Mainnet. Please be aware that the Vertcoin Testnet chain has not been mined 100% of the time in the past, if you make transactions on the Vertcoin testnet that do not go through it is likely because the chain has stopped being mined.
BE CAREFUL WITH YOUR COINS, ONLY TEST WITH WHAT YOU ARE OKAY WITH LOSING IF YOU USE THE MAINNET.

Vertcoin Testnet Coins

https://tvtc.blkidx.org/faucet/
I've included some documentation on LIT I created which includes information I found to be useful: https://github.com/e-corp-sam-sepiol/vertnode/blob/mastedocs/lit.md
Please visit the mit-dci/lit github repository for the most up to date information on lit: https://github.com/mit-dci/lit

Vertnode | Automated Vertcoin Node Installation Script

https://github.com/e-corp-sam-sepiol/vertnode

Recommended: Use Etcher to install the chosen OS to your microSD card / USB flash drive.

If you intend on installing Ubuntu Server 16.04 to your Intel NUC please use Etcher to install the .iso to your USB flash drive.
https://etcher.io/
PLEASE NOTE THIS SCRIPT MAY GIVE AN ERROR. THIS IS THE NATURE OF TESTING. PLEASE REPORT YOUR ERRORS IF YOU WANT THEM TO BE FIXED/RESOLVED. THANK YOU FOR BETTERING THE DEVELOPMENT OF THIS SCRIPT.

Ubuntu Server 16.04 Setup Details

You can use different clients to ssh into your node. One option is using PuTTY or Git Bash on Windows which is included in the desktop version of Git. If you are using Linux you can simply open a new terminal window and ssh to the IP address of your node (hardware you intend installing the Vertcoin node on).
You will need to know the IP address of your node, this can be found on your router page.
ssh 192.168.1.5 -l pi For example, this command uses ssh to login to 192.168.1.5 using the -l login name of pi. The IP address of your node will likely be different for you, in this example I am logging into a Raspberry Pi which has a default login name of pi.
A brief list of commands that can be used to check on the Vertcoin node status:
vertcoin-cli getblockchaininfo | Grab information about your blockchain
vertcoin-cli getblockcount | Grab the current count of blocks on your node
vertcoin-cli getconnectioncount | Grab the current count of connections to your node. A number of connections larger than 8 means that you have incoming connections to your node. The default settings are to make 8 outgoing connections. If you want incoming connections please port forward your Raspberry Pi in your Router settings page.
vertcoin-cli getpeerinfo | Grab the information about the peers you have connected to / are connected to
vertcoin-cli getnettotals | Grab network data, how much downloaded/upload displayed in bytes
tail -f ~/.vertcoin/debug.log | Output the latest lines in the Vertcoin debug.log to see verbose information about the Vertcoin daemon (ctrl+c to stop)
Thank you to all who have helped me and inspired me thus far, @b17z, @jamesl22, @vertcoinmarketingteam, @canen, @flakfired, @etang600, @BDF, @tucker178, @Xer0
This work is dedicated to the users of Vertcoin, thank you for making this possible.
7/20/2018 Thank you @CommodoreAmiga for the incredibly generous tip <3
You can reach me @Sam Sepiol#3396 on the Vertcoin Discord, here on reddit or @ [email protected]
submitted by ecorp-sam-sepiol to vertcoin [link] [comments]

Trying to get the latest tor installed on raspberry pi

Trying to get the latest tor installed on my raspberry pi per these instructions:
https://medium.com/@meeDamian/bitcoin-through-tor-on-rbp3-12d38a1506f
Problem, though when importing the latest tor repo keys:
https://tor.stackexchange.com/questions/19352/i-cant-import-the-tor-gpg-debian-repository-keys
gpg: packet(13) too large gpg: read_block: read error: Invalid packet gpg: no valid OpenPGP data found. gpg: Total number processed: 0 
My fear is that the gpg on my pi os (stretch) is too old and too strict with it's parsing rules, but it doesn't look that easy to update gpg on the pi. (Build from source on the pi?)
Any advice? I'll pass it along to Damian to update his tutorial.
submitted by moral_agent to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

A Guide to Keeping Keys Offline Using Armory +rPi

Hi Redditors.
I am going to post in this thread my experiences in getting my Desktop (Debian) machine running Armory in watch-only mode, and coupling that with an offline Raspberry Pi (which holds my private keys) for signing the transactions previously made in watch-only mode.
I actually compiled Armory from source directly on my Pi. This guide is probably more for the bitcoin 'power user', as to run Armory online, and broadcast the signed transactions, you need to have a bitcoin full node running (bitcoind).
Basic requirements:
Aimed-for Setup:
I'll post the guide in digestible sections...

Section 1

I should begin by saying I installed source code from git, and got Armory to build the DB on my desktop initially, WITHOUT creating a wallet.. (This allowed me to debug what was going on a little!)
Go to Bitcoin.org, select Armory..
It leads to a Download from Git:
https://github.com/goatpig/BitcoinArmory/releases
Followed the procedure for Linux Debian verify code, compile, install, all straight-forward..
Began by running bitcoind, and telling Armory where to find it. This is the command I used, obviously it was all on one line and didn't include the arrows/explanations!:
python ArmoryQt.py \ --satoshi-datadir=/BlockChain/chain20180414/blocks \ # <-----(where my bitcoind blocks live) --datadir=/ArmoryDataDi \ # <-----(this is instead of ~/.armory) --dbdir=/ArmoryDataDidatabases # <-------(again, non std. place used for Armory's databases.. my choice.) 
So, on the Desktop, after the initial "build databases"
(NB the initial "Build Databases" took about 1.5h and my two CPUs were maxed the whole time, Temps up to 62C. Not ideal; Im not in a rush!)
I then wanted to import a watch-only wallet.
Before I did this, I took a full backup of the Armory data dir:
/ArmoryDataDi
(or ~/.armory in a default installation).
I'd hate to have to make Armory do another full sync with the bitcoind node!

Section 2

Next step: offline wallet (with Private Keys) is on a Raspberry Pi.
I downloaded the source and managed to compile it on the pi itself! :)
Though there were some gymnastics needed to setup the Pi.
My Pi is running Raspbian based on Wheezy.. quite old!
I did the following on the Pi:
apt-get update apt-get upgrade (<---took about an hour!) apt-get install autotools-dev apt-get install autoconf 
Then I followed the instructions exactly as I had done for my Debian Desktop machine, EXCEPT:
I had to increase the Pi's swap space. I upped it from 100Mb to 400Mb.
The compilation took 7 hours, and my poor SD card got a thrashing.
But after compilation, I put the Swap back to 100Mb and Armory runs ok with about 150Mb of memory (no swap needed).
Swap increase on the Pi:
use your favourite editor, and open the file /etc/dphys-swapfile
add/change the following line:
CONF_SWAPSIZE=400 
Then, REBOOT the Pi:
sudo shutdown -h -P now 
Once the compilation was done on the Pi, put the swap back, rebooted and created an Armory wallet.
I added manual entropy and upped the encryption 'time' from 250ms to 2500ms - since the Pi is slow, but I'll be happy to wait for more iterations in the Key Derivation Function.
Once the wallet was created, it obviously prompts you for backup.
I want to add a private key of my own (i.e. import), so don't do the backup until this is over.
I import my Private Key, and Armory checks that this corresponds to a Public Key, which I check is correct.
This is the point now where the Pi storage medium (e.g an SD card) has to be properly destroyed if you ever get rid of it.
I had thought that now would be a good time to decide if your new wallet will generate Segwit receiving addresses, and also addresses used to receive 'change' after a transaction..
But it seems Armory WON'T let you switch to P2SH-P2WPKH unless your Armory is connected to a node offering "WITNESS" service.
Obviously, my Pi is offline and will never connect to a node, so the following will not work on the Pi:
NB: I thought about setting this on the Debian "watch-only" wallet, but that would surely mean doom, as the Pi would not know about those addresses and backups might not keep them.. who knows...
So, end result:- no segwit for me just yet in my offline funds.

--If anyone can offer a solution to this, I'd be very grateful--

Section 3

Ok, now this is a good point to back up your wallet on the Pi. It has your imported keys. I choose a Digital Backup - and put it on a USB key, which will never touch the internet and will be stored off-site. I also chose to encrypt it, because I'm good with passwords..
NB: The Armory paper backup will NOT back up your imported private keys, so keep those somewhere if you're not sweeping them. It would be prudent to have an Armory paper backup anyway, but remember it will likely NOT help you with that imported key.
Now for the watch-only copy of the wallet. I want to get the "watch-only" version onto my Desktop Debian machine.
On the Pi, I created (exported to a USB key) a "watching-only" copy of my wallet.
I would use the RECOMMENDED approach, export the "Entire Wallet File".
As you will see below, I initially exported only the ROOT data, which will NOT capture the watching-only part of the Private Key I entered manually above (i.e. the public Key!).
Now, back on the Debian Desktop machine...
I stopped all my crontab jobs; just give Armory uninterrupted CPU/memory/disk...
I also stopped bitcoind and made a backup prior to any watch-only wallet being imported.
I already made a backup of Armory on my Desktop, before any wallet import.
(this was needed, as I made a mistake.. see below)
So on the Debian Desktop machine, I begin by firing up bitcoind.
my command for this is:
./bitcoind -daemon -datadir=/BlockChain/chain20180414 -dbcache=400 -maxmempool=400 

Section 4

I try running Armory like this:
(I'm actually starting Armory from a script - StartArm.sh)
Inside the script StartArm.sh, it has the line:
python ArmoryQt.py --ram-usage=4 --satoshi-datadir=/BlockChain/chain20180414/blocks --datadir=/ArmoryDataDi --dbdir=/ArmoryDataDidatabases 
I know from bitter experience that doing a scan over the blockchain for a new wallet takes a looong time and a lot of CPU, and I'd like it to play nicely; not gobble all the memory and swap and run my 2xCPUs both at 100% for four hours...
So... I aim to run with --ram-usage=X and --thread-count=X
(For me in the end, X=1 but I began with X=4)
I began with --ram-usage=4 (<--- = 4x128Mb)
The result is below...
TypeError: cannot concatenate 'str' and 'int' objects 
It didn't recognise the ram-usage and carried on, crippling my Debian desktop PC.
This is where it gets dangerous; Armory can gobble so much memory and CPU that the windowing environment can cease up, and it can take over 30 minutes just to exit nicely from bitcoind and ArmoryDB.
So, I ssh to the machine from another computer, and keep an eye on it with the command
"free -h" 
I'd also be able to do a "sudo reboot now" if needed from here.

Section 5

So, trying to get my --ram-usage command recognised, I tried this line (added quotes):
python ArmoryQt.py --ram-usage="4" --satoshi-datadir=/BlockChain/chain20180414/blocks --datadir=/ArmoryDataDi --dbdir=/ArmoryDataDidatabases 
But no, same error...
Loading Armory Engine: Armory Version: 0.96.4 Armory Build: None PyBtcWallet Version: 1.35 Detected Operating system: Linux OS Variant : ('debian', '9.4', '') User home-directory : /home/ Satoshi BTC directory : /BlockChain/chain20180414 Armory home dir : /ArmoryDataDi ArmoryDB directory : /ArmoryDataDidatabases Armory settings file : /ArmoryDataDiArmorySettings.txt Armory log file : /ArmoryDataDiarmorylog.txt Do wallet checking : True (ERROR) ArmoryUtils.py:3723 - Unsupported language specified. Defaulting to English (en) (ERROR) ArmoryQt.py:1833 - Failed to start Armory database: cannot concatenate 'str' and 'int' objects Traceback (most recent call last): File "ArmoryQt.py", line 1808, in startArmoryDBIfNecessary TheSDM.spawnDB(str(ARMORY_HOME_DIR), TheBDM.armoryDBDir) File "/BitcoinArmory/SDM.py", line 387, in spawnDB pargs.append('--ram-usage=' + ARMORY_RAM_USAGE) TypeError: cannot concatenate 'str' and 'int' objects 

Section 6

So, I edit the Armory python file SDM.py:
if ARMORY_RAM_USAGE != -1: pargs.append('--ram-usage=4') #COMMENTED THIS, SO I CAN HARDCODE =4 # ' + ARMORY_RAM_USAGE) 
Running it, I now have acknowledgement of the --ram-usage=4:
(WARNING) SDM.py:400 - Spawning DB with command: /BitcoinArmory/ArmoryDB --db-type="DB_FULL" --cookie --satoshi-datadir="/BlockChain/chain20180414/blocks" --datadir="/ArmoryDataDi" --dbdir="/ArmoryDataDidatabases" --ram-usage=4 
Also, even with ram-usage=4, it used too much memory, so I told it to quit.
It took over 30 minutes to stop semi-nicely. The last thing it reported was:
ERROR - 00:25:21: (StringSockets.cpp:351) FcgiSocket::writeAndRead FcgiError: unexpected fcgi header version 
But that didn't seem to matter or corrupt the Armory Database, so I think it's ok.
So, I get brave and change SDM.py as below, and I make sure my script has a command line for --ram-usage="ABCDE" and --thread-count="FGHIJ"; the logic being that these strings "ABCDE" will pass the IF criteria below, and my hardcoded values will be used...
if ARMORY_RAM_USAGE != -1: pargs.append('--ram-usage=1') #COMMENTED THIS, SO I CAN HARDCODE =1 # ' + ARMORY_RAM_USAGE) if ARMORY_THREAD_COUNT != -1 pargs.append('--thread-count=1') #COMMENTED THIS, SO I CAN HARDCODE =1 #' + ARMORY_THREAD_COUNT) 
So, as usual, I use my script and start this with: ./StartArm.sh
(which uses command line:)
python ArmoryQt.py --ram-usage="ABCDE" --thread-count="FGHIJ" --satoshi-datadir=/BlockChain/chain20180414/blocks --datadir=/ArmoryDataDi --dbdir=/ArmoryDataDidatabases 
(this forces it to use my hard-coded values in SDM.py...)
So, this is the command which it reports that it starts with:
(WARNING) SDM.py:400 - Spawning DB with command: /BitcoinArmory/ArmoryDB --db-type="DB_FULL" --cookie --satoshi-datadir="/BlockChain/chain20180414/blocks" --datadir="/ArmoryDataDi" --dbdir="/ArmoryDataDidatabases" --ram-usage=1 --thread-count=1 
Again, this is where it gets dangerous; Armory can gobble so much memory and CPU that the windowing environment can cease up. So I ssh to the machine and keep an eye on it with:
"free -h" 

Section 7

So, on the Debian Desktop PC, I inserted the USB stick with the watch-only wallet I exported from the Pi.
Start Armory...
Import "Entire Wallet File" watch-only copy.
Wait 4 hours..
YAY!!!
After running Armory for about 30m, the memory usage dropped by 400m... wierd...
It took ~2 hours to get 40% completion.
After 3.5 hours it's almost there...
The memory went up to about 1.7Gb in use and 900Mb of Swap, but the machine remained fairly responsive throughout, apart from a few (10?) periods at the start, where it appeared to freeze for 10-30s at a time.
(That's where my ssh session came in handy - I could check the machine was still ok with a "free -h" command)
Now, I can:
Create an unsigned transaction on my Desktop,
Save the tx to USB stick,
Move to the Pi,
Sign the tx,
Move back to the Desktop,
Broadcast the signed tx.

Section 8

My initial Mistake:
This caused me to have to roll-back my Armory database, using the backup. so you should try to avoid doing this..
On the Pi, I exported only the ROOT data, which will NOT capture the watching-only part of the Private Key
It is RECOMMENDED to use the Digital Export of Entire Wallet File from the Pi when making a watch-only copy. If you just export just the "ROOT data", not the "Entire Wallet File", you'll have problems if you used an imported Private Key in the offline wallet, like I did.
Using the ROOT data text import, after it finished... my balance was zero. So,. I tried a Help->Rescan Balance (Restart Armory, takes 1minute to get back up and running) No Luck. Still zero balance.
So, I try Rescan Databases.. This will take longer. Nah.. no luck.
So, I tried again, thinking it might be to do with the fact that I imported the text "root data" stuff, instead of following the (Recommended) export of watching-wallet file.
So, I used my Armory backup, and wound back the ArmoryDataDi to the point before the install of the (zero balance) wallet. (you should not need to do this, as you will hopefully use the RECOMMENDED approach of exporting the "Entire Wallet File"!)
submitted by fartinator to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Got my Bitcoin/LN Node up and running on testnet. Have a few questions.

Bare with with me as I'm still new to fully understanding how Bitcoin and the LN work. And I'm an even bigger newbie when it comes to Linux, which is why I installed 'Raspberry PI Desktop'. I wanted to closely follow the guide mentioned below (with a few changes as to accommodate the i686 processor).

I had some old hardware laying around and decided to attempt a Bitcoin/LN Node setup using the following guide: https://github.com/Stadicus/guides/blob/masteraspibolt/README.md

My Hardware Specs:
I downloaded the "Debian Stretch with Raspberry PI Desktop" disk image on the 32GB SD Memory Card. I then tried to do an install to the 4GB SSD, but I don't think the 4GB was enough disk space because the system install would stop/error at around 32%. After several failed attempts I decided to just "Run with persistence" from the SD card, which worked. After about a day and a half (breaks in between), I finally got testnet up and running. I'll be staying on testnet for a while until I familiarize myself with everything, with that said, I'm hoping some of you Linux and Bitcoin savvy people can answer a few questions/concerns.

TL;DR: I setup a Bitcoin/LN Node on testnet, and have a few questions below.

Linux Related:
  1. On boot/reboot I get this message below, should I be concerned? I'm not sure what it means, how can I stop this message? I'm able to just hit Ctrl+D, which the system continues booting normally afterwards.
"No Caching mode page found" and "Assuming drive cache: write through"
"After logging in type 'journalctl -xb' to view system logs, 'systemctl reboot' to reboot or ^D to try again to boot into default mode."

Bitcoin/LN Related:
  1. Is the LN wallet the same as my Bitcoin Node wallet? (I don't see the step where I created a wallet on the "Bitcoin" section using the guide I mentioned at the top of this post. But I do see the step of creating the LN wallet in the "Lightning" section by using the following command - "lncli --network=testnet create".)
  2. Do I need to unlock my wallet every time I restart? Is this required to use the LN? (I noticed when I restart my system and do a "sudo journalctl -f -u lnd", It prompts me for my wallet password, or create a new one.)
  3. What are the characters at the end of the command below(np2wkh) when creating a new address? Do I generate a new address every time I want to receive a payment? ("lncli --network=testnet newaddress np2wkh")
  4. Why does my LN wallet balance display differently than what I requested from a faucet? (The testnet faucet says 0.01 max, which I sent to my wallet address. But my LN wallet displays as "total_balance 199637".)
  5. If I need to restart my node, is there a correct way of doing so? How do I make sure i don't affect open channels?
I know I have other questions, but I can't remember them off the top of my head right now. Thanks

submitted by StarsAndBolts to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Homelab collective ressources post!

Hey guys!
I'm fairly new to this sub and to having a home lab in general and I found this community to be so kind and helping, I wanted to give back what I've learned. I'm seeing a lot of questions asked around on improvements and on what to do with x extra hardware so I thought it would be nice to have a thread to regroup that.
 
I'll put here some stuff I gathered and the most common questions I've seen, feel free to contribute and i'll update the post along.
 
Latest Additions
 
Homelab Dashboard
Posts about dashboards have been growing lately and here are some of the best that were kind enough to provide us with their sources.
User Screenshot Source
yours truly http://imgur.com/a/GhCNH https://github.com/Gabisonfire/dashboard-q
lastditchefrt http://i.imgur.com/5zQdao4.png https://github.com/d4rk22/Network-Status-Page
_SleepingBag_ http://i.imgur.com/Ql9ZM4W.png https://github.com/jsank/homelabdash
NiknakSi https://niknak.org/extras/sysinfo TBA
DainBramaged http://imgur.com/jYNlUEQ https://github.com/gordonturneBigBoard
michaelh4u https://i.imgur.com/XkZwMKj.png https://github.com/michaelh4u/homelabfrontpage
spigotx http://imgur.com/a/1zMht https://github.com/spigotx/HomeLab2
SirMaster https://nicko88.com/ https://github.com/dashbad/plex-server-status
yourofl10 http://imgur.com/a/AyROa TBA
TheBobWiley http://imgur.com/a/oU6d3 https://github.com/TheBobWiley/ManageThis-LandingPages
0110010001100010 http://i.imgur.com/iwtQcsL.jpg https://github.com/danodemano/monitoring-scripts
mescon & SyNiK4L https://i.imgur.com/gqdVM6p.jpg https://github.com/mescon/Muximux
ak_rex http://i.imgur.com/a/RJkrT https://github.com/ak-rex/homelab-dashboard
 
Or build yours from scratch: PRTG API, ELK, Grafana, freeboard, JumpSquares
 
Some other resources: Custom Monitoring Scripts by 0110010001100010
 
Credits to apt64 for his original post
= Pi specific =
 
= Download Automation =
 
= Virtualization =
 
= Monitoring =
 
= Media Center =
 
= Remote access =
 
= VOIP =
 
= Networking =
 
= File Servers/Storage/RAID =
 
= Cameras =
 
= Documentation =
 
= Dynamic DNS =
 
= Backup =
 
= Creating network diagrams =
 
= Guides =
 
= Misc =
 
That's all I could come up with on top of my head + some research, passing over to you guys so we can get a nice complete list!
 
Let's try and stick with free(or mostly) softwares, let me know if you guys feel otherwise.
submitted by Gabisonfire to homelab [link] [comments]

Let's build an army of Ethereum nodes!

Hi everyone!
I ran into Ethereum several months ago while reading about bitcoin and the blockchain and was quite impressed by some videos explaining the project (most of them by Vitalik himself). During this time I've tried to educate myself on this breakthrough technology. And at this point, I'd like to get a little more involved. I think that one easy way to contribute to this fascinating project is by running a full Ethereum node, so let me share some stuff of my experience of setting up an Ethereum node on Raspberry Pi 3.
While doing some research about the best Ethereum client for my raspberry Pi 3 I realized that pretty much there are no ARM nodes on the network (according to ethernodes.org). Shouldn't be precisely the opposite? ARM devices such as Raspberry Pi have a good performance, are cheap and power-efficient.
I looked into "EthEmbedded" [1] (great project, by the way) but it is mainly focused on Geth and Eth clients and you need to run the Ethereum clients manually. It's built on top of Ubuntu mate (and we need to keep things light). Besides, I was looking something more Flash & Play :-).
So, I compiled Parity from source on my raspberry Pi 3 (which is the most efficient Ethereum client out there [2]) and gave it a try. I was really surprised with the overall performance and thought that it would be great to get an Ethereum node up and running easiest way possible.
So, I built a custom Raspbian image which runs Parity as a boot up service and starts syncing the blockchain with no user interaction. This is what I got so far:
A custom [3] Raspbian [4] image with Ethcore Parity 1.3 [5] integrated. The image is generated using pi-gen [6] (plus a couple of files for Parity installation)
Some remarks:
Final thoughts:
I think there are several reasons to try to increase Ethereum ARM nodes in the coming months:
You can download the Custom Raspbian Image here:
http://www.ethraspbian.com/downloads/2016-09-09-ethraspbian.img.zip
For further installation instructions please visit:
https://github.com/diglos/pi-gen
Let me know your comments.
Let's do this. Mine is up and running :-)
TL;DR: If you want to contribute to the Ethereum network, get a Raspberry pi 3, install the OS image into your microSD card, connect the ethernet cable and power on your device. This is it, flash and play :-), you are already running an Ethereum node!
submitted by diglos76 to ethereum [link] [comments]

Tested, step-by-step tutorial to run a 21 Bitcoin Computer as a virtual machine /r/Bitcoin

Tested, step-by-step tutorial to run a 21 Bitcoin Computer as a virtual machine /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Help please, Staking reddcoin on Raspberry Pi (Raspbian Stretch with desktop)

Hello,
I could really use some help setting up a reddcoin wallet on the Raspberry pi. I've tried executing the following 2 guides, but unfortunatly they keep giving me errors. Guide1: https://www.reddit.com/reddCoin/comments/2b8wqm/tutorial_compiling_and_running_the_reddcoin/ Guide2: http://d-lindemann.de/2017/09/reddcoin-staking-mit-raspberry-pi/
instead of using the recommended "Raspbian (Debian Wheezy). The image file name is 2014-06-20-wheezy-raspbian.img." i'm using the latest " Raspbian Stretch with desktop Image with desktop based on Debian Stretch Version: November 2017 Release date: 2017-11-29 Kernel version: 4.9"
Also instead of using Reddcoin v1.3.1.2 i decided to go with the* Reddcoin V2.0.0.0 (latest version todate)*
every step untill step 6 seems to work fine, but then after executing command: make -f makefile.unix" the following error message appears:
make: makefile.unix: No such file or directory make: *** No rule to make target 'makefile.unix'. Stop.
researching that issue led me to abandon the guide1 and move to a more recent version of a guide. https://github.com/joroob/reddcoin/blob/mastedoc/rasp-tut.md following those steps lead to a bignum error at 6.3 after excecuting commands
cd src (to take me to reddcoin/src) make (to start compiling i assume)
the bignum error i'm experiencing now seems to be described very well here: https://github.com/reddcoin-project/reddcoin/issues/103 In there i excecuted the following commands to see if my dependencies were correct.
sudo apt-get build-essential   sudo apt-get install build-essential   sudo apt-get install libtool autotools-dev autoconf   sudo apt-get install libssl-dev   sudo apt-get install libboost-all-dev   sudo add-apt-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install db4.8 sudo apt-get install libdb4.8-dev sudo apt-get install libdb4.8++-dev sudo apt-get install libminiupnpc-dev sudo apt-get install libqt4-dev libprotobuf-dev protobuf-compiler sudo apt-get install libqrencode-dev cd reddcoin .>/autogen.sh ./configure make
However this did not seem to clear my issue. reading on they talk about it being an issue with libssl in debian 9. with the following link. (at this point i'm noticing how the further i go, the less ground is beneath me to stand on.. and i'm not a good swimmer in unix).
anyways final post there says the following code should fix it: https://github.com/peercoin/peercoin/commit/5b09830e5de0f5105534e69dbf4acffb3255869b But what do i do with this link i have no idea. and that's kinda where my progress halts as i cannot for the life of me find out what to do next to troubleshoot this issue.
So TL:DR I'm trying to use the make command in ~/reddcoin/src however it's giving me BIGNUM errors preventing me from making progress.
I'm using PI model B+, Raspbian stretch latest version plz halp...
submitted by FloydStash to reddCoin [link] [comments]

[Guide] Setting up Trezor + Electrum 2.02beta + armory on a Raspberry Pi 2. Cold offline signing for $40

Having just received my Pi 2, I am happy to report that a fresh Raspbian install, on an 8 GB Class 10 MicroSD card : Electrum / Armory / Trezor / BTChip all work with my Single Board Computer setup script (it also works for Pi B, Pi B+ Raspbian and BeagleBone Black Debian & ubuntu, also tested on Odroid C1 Ubuntu 14.4)
The full "!" installation takes about 40 mins on Pi 2, which is at least twice as fast as on the Pi B+ / BBB
Notes
submitted by Aussiehash to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Tested, step-by-step tutorial to run a 21 Bitcoin Computer as a virtual machine

Many thanks to ButtcoinEE and ecafyelims for initial pointers, but if I understood correctly, both users said they hadn't actually tried it themselves. So here comes a tutorial based on something I actually tried. Best of all: You don't even need a Raspberry Pi! We'll run it as a virtual machine.
The first step is to get a Debian 8 (Jessie) installation up and running. You might want to install that inside a VMWare/Virtualbox machine. I'll be using Vagrant here ( https://www.vagrantup.com/ ) which makes it easy to manage virtual machines like that and already has a Debian 8 image in the catalog. So get Vagrant for your platform and then do something like this:
vagrant init ARTACK/debian-jessie vagrant up 
You should now be able to SSH into the machine:
vagrant ssh 
Now that we have a Debian up and running, let's first get some packages we'll need later:
sudo su # become root apt-get update apt-get upgrade apt-get install apt-transport-https git cython3 python3-setuptools 
Add the 21 Debian repository:
echo "deb https://apt.21.co stable main" > /etc/apt/sources.list.d/twentyone.list apt-get update 
It'll complain about a missing GPG key, but you can just ignore that.
We should be able to do 'apt-get install two1' now, but it complains about a missing package 'python3-sha256'. The reason for that is probably, that we are doing this on a x86 architecture, where the packages are slightly different than the Raspberry Pi's ARM architecture. So we'll just manually install the package and have it ignore the dependency errors:
aptitude download two1 dpkg -i two1_1.0.0-1_all.deb 
Now let it try to fetch as many of the dependencies as possible:
apt-get -f install 
And try to install again (had to do this again, not sure why):
dpkg -i two1_1.0.0-1_all.deb 
The 21 binary should now be available:
which 21 # => /usbin/21 
Before we can run it, we'll need that missing python-256 package. We can install it manually from https://github.com/cloudtools/sha256 :
git clone https://github.com/cloudtools/sha256.git cd sha256 python3 setup.py sdist python3 setup.py install 
Now try to get a status report via the 21 tool:
21 status 
If everything worked out, you should see something like:
You do not have a Bitcoin wallet configured. Let's create one. Press any key ... 
and will also be asked to pick a username for a 21.co account.
All 21 Bitcoin computers are networked together into a VPN using the tool ZeroTier ( https://www.zerotier.com ). Let's also set that up:
wget https://download.zerotier.com/dist/zerotier-one_1.1.0_amd64.deb dpkg -i zerotier-one_1.1.0_amd64.deb 
We'll have to extract the credentials for the specific network they use from 21's zerotier package:
mkdir credentials cd credentials wget https://apt.21.co/pool/z/ze/zerotier-one_1.1.0-1_armhf.deb ar x zerotier-one_1.1.0-1_armhf.deb tar xf data.tar.xz cp valib/zerotier-one/updates.d/ZeroTierOneInstaller-linux-armv6l-1_1_0 /valib/zerotier-one/updates.d/ 
Before we join the network, we need to lock down our machine. That's actually a bit tricky, as these Vagrant images aren't really designed with security in mind, but rather only to be used for local testing. I think it should be enough to do:
passwd vagrant rm /home/vagrant/.ssh/authorized_keys 
Note that you won't be able to use 'vagrant ssh' any longer afterwards, as we just deleted the standard Vagrant key-based login. You'll have to use 'ssh [email protected]' instead. Now we are ready to join the network:
wget https://gist.githubusercontent.com/balajis/6d495bb40fb157a58677/raw/21-join.py python3 21-join.py python3 21-join.py # might have to try this twice as well ifconfig zt0 # will show your new IP within the VPN 
The 21 tools have a concept of both an on-chain balance and an off-chain balance - the latter being managed by 21's server. You can deposit to your on-chain balance, but currently the only way to increase the off-chain balance is by mining or by receiving payments from others. Without the mining chip it's therefore a bit tricky to increase that off-chain balance. I hear that a feature request is being considered, to allow moving funds from on-chain to off-chain.
That's all! If you want to give it a shot, you should probably move fast, as 21 has some DRM in the works, as per this comment: https://www.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/3tnjz7/tutorial_turn_your_35_raspberry_pi_into_a_21/cx7tih3 .
This was brought to you by https://coinado.io/ - cloud torrenting for command line fans. Check us out - we are also big on micropayments! ;-)
submitted by coinadoio to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Trying to set up a BU node, but need a hand setting signals

Just a little bit of preamble for now, TL:DR below.
I first got into Bitcoin back in about 2012/13 whilst studying Comp Sci. Now I'm a Computing Science teacher in an English High School.
In February I found my old wallet.dat file and discovered that when I stopped looking at BTC back after selling about 1 BTC to pay a parking ticket back in 2013 (Price was about £36/BTC and the ticket was about £30) that the tiny "worthless" fraction of a BTC now had some value and I've been working hard to invest it and make it grow.
I've also been trying to get my head around the whole scaling debate just now and feel that SegWit just doesn't feel like the right solution, so I'm in the process of setting up a few nodes. One on my server, one on a Raspberry pi at home and one on a server at the school I teach at (since I was able to convince the network admin that it was a fun project that I could use for some teaching). This is where I hit the issues. On these three machines I've got the BU client installed, but can't figure out how to get them to signal something other than a 16MB blocksize. From the GUI on my desktop it's easy enough, but just can't find out how to it on the headless machines.
Any guidance would be appreciated.
TLDR: Got a few headless BU Nodes syncing up and want to set the Excessive Bytes value, but can't figure out how. All three are running on various Debian releases. Any advice would be appreciated.
Thanks
submitted by NimmoG to btc [link] [comments]

fakd: The FAK Anywhere CLI Client & Server

These are new clients to support servers and devices that are not able to run FakeCoin-qt.
They should work on everything from a MIPS router to an IBM mainframe and anything in between.

Commands

$ fakd

Full node server.walletfunctionalitysoldseparately.
This has been used as the backend for the block explorer from day one.
Stable. Secure. Easy to set up. Supports JSON-RPC and WebSockets.

$ fakctl

Provides an easy way to query the fakd server using the same commands as the RPC console in FakeCoin-qt.
$ fakctl getmininginfo
{
"blocks": 17675,
"currentblocksize": 520,
"currentblockweight": 2080,
"currentblocktx": 1,
"difficulty": 467.80165986,
"errors": "",
"generate": false,
"genproclimit": 12,
"hashespersec": 0,
"networkhashps": 3667939,
"pooledtx": 0,
"testnet": false
}

$ fakwallet

Work in progress. Once finished can be a drop in replacement for fakecoind.

Install

Step 1: Get a Go compiler

Step 2: Install fakd & fakctrl

go get -u fakco.in/fakd/...

Step 3: There is no step 3

The compiled binaries should now be in $GOPATH/bin ready to use.

Cross Compiling

Linux Server

GOOS=linux GOARCH=amd64 go install fakco.in/fakd/...

Raspberry Pi

GOOS=linux GOARCH=arm GOARM=5 go install fakco.in/fakd/...

My local FreeNAS because why not.

GOOS=freebsd GOARCH=amd64 go install fakco.in/fakd/...

Windows XP? Pentium 4? What? Why? ok...

GOOS=windows GOARCH=386 go go install fakco.in/fakd/...
submitted by Valken32 to FakeCoin [link] [comments]

Zeus/Gaw ASIC Setup Guide for Linux/Raspberry Pi

So I recently I became quite interested in mining and cyptocurrencies in general. So interested in fact that I bit the bullet and decided to buy myself a GAW Fury.
I then spent some time doing research on how to set up a GAW or Zeus ASIC on Linux, in particular on a Raspberry Pi, and have found most guides to be awful. The reason they are so bad IMHO is that they assume quite a bit of prior knowledge, either with Linux or mining, and give very little instructions. So I have tried to put together a guide that requires very little prior knowledge.
It is my aim that anyone could get their shiny new asic up and mining in no time using this guide. Anyway, I present...

The Complete Noobs Guide to Setting Up a Zeus or Gaw ASIC on Debian/Ubuntu/Raspberry Pi

Resources

About Cyrptocurrencies and Their Jargon

If you are new to cryptocurrencies and how they work I suggest taking a look at this series of KhanAcademy videos. They are for Bitcoin but the theory is the same. I found them very helpful when it came to understanding what mining actually does and the mechanics of cyrptocurrencies.
Also take a look at sircamm22 his info found here, is great and breaks down a large number of concepts. I slightly disagree with no. 21 regarding preordering. Just exercise common sense.

Linux

If you are new to Linux you could follow along by simply typing in the commands. However I highly recommend taking the time to learn what you are doing. This course is a great place to start.

Computer Setup

By the end of this section you will have your device turned on, fully setup and connected to the internet with.
Note: Commands to be typed into the command line will be displayed like this:
echo Hello World

Desktop/Laptop

For laptops and desktops already running Ubuntu or Debian I will assume you have setup your internet setup as part of the installation.
If not: There are plenty of guides out there and the installation/setup process is very easy. A good place to start for Ubuntu is here.
Now open up a terminal window. Ctrl + alt + t on a standard Ubuntu installation.
If you plan on using this PC without a monitor I would suggest installing an SSH Server.
These commands will be discussed later on in the guide.
sudo apt-get -y install openssh-server
sudo service openssh-server start

Raspberry Pi

The Raspberry Pi Foundation has put together a great guide in PDF format.
Use NOOBS it will save you a lot of trouble. NB: Some SD cards don't support NOOBs but will work fine if the image is put on using a different method.
Here is a great guide for setting up the Raspberry Pi SD card from Elinux.org. In fact it's a great place to start for anything RPi related. Raspberry Pi hub at Elinux.
Once the SD card is setup you will need to insert it into the Raspberry Pi and boot. Install Raspbian from the NOOBs menu and wait.
Follow this guide by Adafruit for first time setup. You will need to enable SSH Server.
I suggest not starting the desktop on boot. It can be easily run from the command line by typing startx.
Follow this guide by Adafruit to setup your network. Found here. No need to do this if you set up previously in the first time config.
We will also at this point want to setup ssh. Again I will point you to an Adafruit guide.
Once done exit back to a standard command line interface. This can be done in LXDE by using the power off menu located in the bottom right corner.

Miner Setup

Installing BFGMiner

If you want to the Raspberry Pi or PC without a monitor go ahead and SSH into your device.
So now you should be staring at a command line interface whether on the device with a monitor or via SSH.
First things first lets make sure we are all up to date. This will update our package list from the repositories and upgrade them to the newest version. "-y" Will simply say yes to any prompts.
sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get -y upgrade
We are going to need to install some useful tools. Git-core is how we will clone and download BFGMiner from GitHub and Screen allows multiple command line instances and means if we exit out of ssh session or quit Terminal on Ubuntu, BFGMiner will continue to run.
sudo apt-get install git-core screen
We also need to download some other tools/dependencies to ensure that BFGMiner will compile successfully.
sudo apt-get -y install build-essential autoconf automake libtool pkg-config libcurl4-gnutls-dev libjansson-dev uthash-dev libncursesw5-dev libudev-dev libusb-1.0-0-dev libevent-dev libmicrohttpd-dev libc-bin
Ok now change into your home directory.
cd ~
And clone BFGMiner by Darkwinde.
git clone https://github.com/Darkwinde/bfgminer.git
Once the download has completed move into the bfgminer directory.
cd bfgminer
The following steps may take a while.
Now run autogen.sh
sudo ./autogen.sh
You will need to make the configure script execuitable.
sudo chmod +x ./configure
Now configure bfgminer
sudo ./configure CFLAGS="-O3" --enable-scrypt
Now lets make!
sudo make
Install BFGMiner
sudo make install
One more thing...
sudo ldconfig

Running BFGMiner

If you haven't already plug in your ASIC.
Just confirm your system is recognising the ASIC.
lsusb
Its output should look similar to this (no need to type this in):
Bus 001 Device 005: ID 10c4:ea60 Cygnal Integrated Products, Inc. CP210x UART Bridge / myAVR mySmartUSB light
Yep there it is our ASIC listed as device 005. There is no need to install any drivers, unlike in windows, as they come in the kernel.
Now lets actually start BFGMiner.
You will want to start a screen session to ensure BFGMiner doesn't quite when you exit.
"-S" is the option for starting a new screen session. You can replace "miner" with anything you like.
screen -S miner
Now you can run the commands below.
Here is a sample of what you should type. You will need to replace somethings with your own values.
sudo bfgminer --scrypt -o stratum+tcp://URL:PORT -u USERNAME -p PASSWORD --zeus-cc CHIPCOUNT --zeus-clk 328 -S zeus:/dev/ttyUSB0
Where:
URL:PORT is the address and port of the pool you wih to use. Now I won't suggest a pool. I will leave that decision up to you. If you do wish to mine DOGE take a look at this site for a list of pools and comparisons.
USERNAME this is the username you use on the pool. Every pool is different. Check your pool's website for details. PASSWORD same as above. Specific to your pool, not every pool requires one.
CHIPCOUNT this is specific to which ASIC you are using.
For GAWMiner ASIC's:
  • War Machine: 256
  • Falcon: 128
  • Black Widow: 64
  • Fury: 6
For ZeusMiner ASIC's:
  • Blizzard: 6
  • Cyclone: 96
  • Hurricane X2: 48
  • Hurricane X3: 64
  • Thunder X2: 96
  • Thunder X3: 128
Now to make sure you don't stop mining when you exit ssh or terminal. Press:
ctrl + a + d
To come back to the BFGMiner screen simply run:
screen -r miner
You're done!!

Start on Boot

First off you will want to make sure you have BFGMiner running correctly. Ensure you have the miners set up properly and your pool correctly configured.
Start a BFGMiner instance, detailed above.
Once the instance has started and you are happy with how everything is working press "s" on your keyboard to enter the settings menu.
Now press the "w" key. Don't press enter. We want to specify where our config will go. Type:
/home/USERNAME/bfgminer.conf
Substitute USERNAME for your user. On a standard RPI install its pi. On ubuntu it's what you set during the instillation.
Now press the enter key to return back to the main BFGMiner screen. Press "q" on your keyboard to exit BFGMiner. You should now be back in the command line.
Now we want to edit a file called rc.local. Any commands in this file will be executed on boot.
sudo nano /etc/rc.local
Depending on your system this file may already contain some commands. Be careful not to delete them.
After the last command and before "exit 0" type the following on one line:
sudo -u USERNAME screen -d -m sudo bfgminer --config /home/USERNAME/bfgminer.conf
Where USERNAME = your username
Hit ctrl + x then y to save and exit nano.
The above command will create a new screen session and run bfgminer using the config we created earlier. All while as our username so that we can easily reattach.
Lets reboot to ensure it is working correctly:
sudo reboot
Once rebooted and logged in, show all running screen sessions:
screen -ls
Reattach to the session. You only need to use the numbers before the first dot.
e.g Mine looks like: 2480..hostname (13/07/14 12:02:09) (Detached). So I type:
screen -r 2480
Verify everything worked as expected. Then ctrl + a + d to exit.
You have now setup BFGMiner to restart on reboot.

Power Failure

If you are using a Raspberry Pi and it loses power it will automatically reboot on receiving power again.
For standard desktop PCs there is an option in some BIOS/UEFI to turn the computer on when it receives power. Consult your motherboard's manual and manufacturer's website.

Sources

Here is where I got my info from.
And of course /dogemining

Wrap Up

Congrats you've done it. You have managed to successfully get your shiny new asic mining away.
I do plan to make another guide detailing how to setup and use StarMiner a ready to go RPi mining distro.
So I hope this is helpful for you guys. I have seen lots of posts asking the exact same questions again and again and I have tried to answer these as best I can. I am still learning about this stuff so if there is something I have missed or a mistake I have made please tell me.
Anyway good luck. And I'll see you at the moon.
Cheers Frogsiedoodle
Edit 1: Layout and formatting.
Edit 2: Added instructions for screen which I initially forgot.
Edit 3: Removed 1 unneeded dependency
Edit 4: Added section on start on reboot and power failure.
submitted by Frogsiedoodle to dogemining [link] [comments]

[Guide] Python-Trezor on cold offline Raspberry Pi

I am happy to report that the python-trezor command line scripts work successfully on a Piper which is really a Raspberry Pi running Debian wheezy.
This does require you to connect your Piper online initially, so I recommend buying a new 4GB SD card and flashing the piper firmware if you have already used piper to generate cold offline keys. You'll need this for the hexagonal screws and this for the wiring
You can download the latest firmware ISO here and here is how you burn the image
From there I did sudo apt-get update and installed the Trezor dependencies including cython, libusb, python-trezor, cython-hidapi, trezor-common and ran sudo python setup.py build/install as per these 2 guides edit : and pip install trezor as per stickac (I have not yet tried the electrum 2 beta parts of the guides, as I don't require cold offline electrum 2)
https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=122438.msg9262821#msg9262821
http://www.reddit.com/TREZOcomments/2jp9uk/tutorial_install_electrum_20_beta_with_trezo
This still does not install the english wordlist which you will need to do manually.
Edit : Adding BIP39 library should also install english.txt
You might also want to download my hidden passphrase/PIN entry python-trezor fork
Lastly I needed to unplug the USB mouse from my keyboard hub, in order to provide Trezor with adequate power.
Confirm that everything is working
./cmdtr.py list
./helloworld.py
Pull out the Ethernet cable, and never plug it back in (without first wiping the SD card)
Congratulations you can now initialize and restore Trezor - in a fully cold offline environment - and if you wish, provide your own entropy
Expert tips :
Delete your shell history
semi-securely delete files off SD flash
Version 2 :
I have added support for the latest electrum 2.0 beta, trezor support and btchip support
Update to the newest github versions
navigate to /python-trezor and git pull navigate to /python-mnemonic and git pull
Update libraries
sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get upgrade sudo apt-get install -f 
Install dependencies
sudo apt-get install python-qt4 python-dev pyqt-dev-tools python-pip sudo apt-get install python-usb libusb-dev sudo pip install --upgrade pyusb 
Install btchip support
mkdir btchip cd btchip get https://hardwarewallet.com/zip/add_btchip_driver.sh sudo bash add_btchip_driver.sh git clone https://github.com/btchip/btchip-python cd btchip-python sudo python setup.py install 
Tests
cd samples python getFirmwareVersion.py cd ../btchip python btchipPersoWizard.py 
btchipPersoWizard.py should bring up a GUI setup wizard if core.usb is setup properly
cd ../.. git clone https://github.com/btchip/btchip-c-api.git cd btchip-c-api mkdir bin make cd bin ./btchip_getFirmwareVersion 
Install electrum 2.0 Beta
git clone https://github.com/spesmilo/electrum cd electrum sudo python setup.py install pyrcc4 icons.qrc -o gui/qt/icons_rc.py python setup.py sdist --format=zip,gztar electrum 
File > New > Hardware wallet. Both Trezor and btchip work as they do on OSX, apart from the Pi's slow CPU taking ages to generate the HD tree and Sync.
Limitations
At this stage a Pi is too slow to receive btchip's 2fa OTP confirmation code, with the auto-type saturating the text buffer. I'm confident Nicholas can fix this in firmware. Edit: an ipad2 + Apple CCK is too slow to buffer the seed about 1/4 times. Edit 2: an iPhone5/retina iPad mini + Lighning to USB camera cable works with btchip with iOS 8.1 with selected text editors.
You can use btchipPersoWizard.py to restore a BIP39 mnemonic, however btchip's HW1 is unable to support on-device BIP39 seed+passphrase, but this feature might be added to the electrum plugin later.
I don't know if greenaddress CRX will work on piper, there doesn't seem to be an official armhf build available from google, and the latest sudo apt-get install chromium version is v22 whereas Chrome is at v38. (it might be possible to download https://github.com/greenaddress/WalletCrx and pack/drag-drop the extension manually in developer mode)
submitted by Aussiehash to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

RetroShare Feature List

Information directly from Team Retroshare DevBlog:
RetroShare Features:
HowTo test RetroShare
ChatServer / IntroServer for making new Friends
RetroShare on Embedded Devices
From Unofficial Wiki
RetroShare on FreenodeIRC
RetroShare on Twitter
RetroShare on GitHub and SourceForge
Plugin Structure
How to Contribute
If you have questions, feel free to ask!
submitted by cavebeat to retroshare [link] [comments]

Installing OpenBazaar on Raspberry Pi 3 (Raspbian "Jessie") Is A Pain - and does not work

Hello, hope to get help in this Bitcoin community which should have the main users of OpenBazaar.
I cannot get this run. Installing on Ubuntu or Linux Mint is utmost simple with the downloadable debian packages (*.deb).
In short:
For the Raspberry Pi (Raspbian Linux) I find various different tutorials on the web, all of which are somehow different and incomplete and of different age (so not sure what Openbazaar and what Raspbian version they refer to). I get one error after another. After several hours I am giving up now. I have installed so many other packages that are allegedly required for OpenBazaar (in one tutorial or another)... but it still does not work.
Not to mention the need to separately install the OpenBazaar Server and Client and the different configuration options, and no tutorial that really explains everything in a proper way how all components work together and what to do depending on the use-case.
This is a shame. OpenBazaar should FIRST run on the Raspberry, because the Raspberry is a low-power-consumption device that can run 24/7 with an electricity bill of only 5-10 EUR per year. And OpenBazaar as a decentralized marketplace is designed for exactly this mode of operation - always online! No way would I use a normal computer for this.
Has anybody successfully managed to install OpenBazaar (1.1.3) on "Raspian Jessie"?
Is a tutorial available that really works completely? Or even better, a debian package?
Actually I was inspired buying a Raspberry Pi because of OpenBazaar in the first place, and now I am stuck.
A good tutorial should include best practice recommendations on all parts, including:
Finally, what I am desperately missing is information how to backup and restore OpenBazaar configurations and move them from one computer to another. For example, I have installed OpenBazaar on my Linux Mint PC some weeks ago and created an account and a listing already, of course with OpenBazaar ID. Needless to say that now that I install OpenBazaar on my Raspberry, I want to use the same account there (instead of on my computer), such that information is not lost.
submitted by Amichateur to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

[Table] IAmA Ubuntu Community Manager at Canonical, author/speaker on Community Management and best practice, and play in metal band Severed Fifth

Verified? (This bot cannot verify AMAs just yet)
Date: 2012-06-05
Link to submission (Has self-text)
Link to my post
Questions Answers
Not sure if any of this is really your job descriptions, but they're the questions I have about Ubuntu anyway. I believe the criticism around Unity could be divided into two broad categories (1) fear of change and (2) critcism about the design/stability of Unity. Back when we originally released Unity into Ubuntu, there was a lot of (1) and some (2). With Ubuntu 12.04 there is a little (1) and not much (2). Unity in 12.04 is significantly faster, better designed, and better executed and I most of the responses I have seen to 12.04 have been praising Unity.
How are you and the rest of Canonical dealing with all of the criticisms of Unity? How are you and the rest of Canonical dealing with all of the criticisms of Unity?
What's the process of implementing Ubuntu for Android like? What do you expect the response to it to be, and how are device manufacturers responding to it? Is Canonical trying to become the Apple of Linux? What other strategies are you implementing to help Linux go mainstream? In terms of fear of change, there will always be some folks who don't like it: that is fine; we have many wonderful options for desktops in Ubuntu. Some folks though feel like we are "dumbing down Linux"; I thoroughly disagree with that notion. Linux should be for everyone, not just Linux geeks, and we want Ubuntu to bring Free Software to everyone, not just a fiefdom populated by those with significant technical skills. What's the process of implementing Ubuntu for Android like? What do you expect the response to it to be, and how are device manufacturers responding to it? Is Canonical trying to become the Apple of Linux? What other strategies are you implementing to help Linux go mainstream?
Can we please get an easier RAID implementation on the desktop flavor Ubuntu? Can we please get an easier RAID implementation on the desktop flavor Ubuntu?
I believe the criticism around Unity could be divided into two broad categories (1) fear of change and (2) critcism about the design/stability of Unity. "I fear Canonical hasn't been listening to the specific concerns of its community when it comes to Unity in particular. It's not that I'm afraid of change, or that it's unstable, it's that it's ugly, unwieldy to use, and non-configurable. The lack of control and configuration coupled with the fact it's been forced down our throats is what really seems to irk the community".
Some folks though feel like we are "dumbing down Linux"; I thoroughly disagree with that notion. Linux should be for everyone, not just Linux geeks. Also, nothing has been "forced down your throat": this is Free Software and you are free to use something else.
Ubuntu, as it stands, is near unusable for a lot of power users who do heavy development work and constantly need to switch applications - and it's 100% because of Unity and "simplifying" the distro. I'll personally be sticking to Debian until this regression goes away. I would consider myself a power user, I am regularly switching applications and it works fine. But here's the thing: this is all personal opinion. It works well for me, perfect! It doesn't work well for you, well you can either help us fix it or use something else. Perfect! Either way, we all get to use Free Software. :-)
Edit: Er, it looks like pseudolobster hit my concern already. Carry on.
Sure, maybe it's time for Ubuntu to move on and try this really ambitious move to dumb down linux for old people, alienating its previous userbase, but it's a damn shame because I used to really like Ubuntu. "Sure, maybe it's time for Ubuntu to move on and try this really ambitious move to dumb down linux for old people, alienating its previous userbase, but it's a damn shame because I used to really like Ubuntu". I always hate to see the term "dumbing down" because it is exclusionary: Ubuntu is for everyone...not just for people with a certain level of expertise. The difference is...for a novice user, they require simple defaults otherwise we lose them, a more technically savvy can dive below the surface and install additional configurability.
Are you still actively trying to push Ubuntu to Android manufacturers/developers? If so, have any responded with any interest? Yes, the convergent device (Ubuntu on Android) is a key area of focus. Canonical engineers have been continuing to build it out and our business team has been working with various handset makers to sign agreements. I believe there are a few deals underway.
Also, any chance that private developers (Cyanogenmod/MIUI/AOKP/AOSP) will get a chance to bake Ubuntu into custom ROMs? As for people taking it and baking it into custom ROMs, I don't see why this couldn't happen in the future. It is unlikely to be one of our standard releases as most people don't install new OSs on their phones, but I am sure the software will be available for integration some time.
You know me in real life, although not by this username. I install a new OS on my phone regularly...so, you know at least one. ;-) Hrm... :-)
How did the Humble Bundle thing go? We're they/Ubuntu receptive and it all went smoothly? Any chance of getting the back catalog into the software center? The Humble Indie Bundle release has gone really well. We had nearly 10000 downloads in 72 hours, and the downloads are continuing. A number of previous games are in the Ubuntu Software Center and we are working on others too.
Also any chance to standardizing a set of libraries for game development in Ubuntu, kind of like what ya'll did for Gtk apps and Quickly? As for Quickly and game development: I would love to see that, we just need a community member to contribute to this. If you (or someone else) wants to help, I would be happy to help you get connected to the right person.
Does this mean that you plan to allow us to link games from previous bundles that are in the software center to our account? I would like to be able to link my purchase of World of Good, Braid, Bittrip runner, and probably othes so that I can more easily download and install them. I think that would be the optimal option.
On a non "I h8 unity" tangent, gaming (and Netflix, to an extent) is a big part of the reason I'm still on Windows some of the time. Are you excited that Steam is coming to Linux? What are the major hurdles, in your opinion, to a better gaming experience on Linux? I am stoked about Steam coming to Linux. The challenge will be hardware support for some graphics cards (most work great), but I suspect that Steam on Linux will apply pressure to the card makers.
What do you see as the future of the music industry? Big, professional, signed artists with major labels.
Newer artists with smaller labels, still probably working part time.
For the big artists, the traditional music industry (make music, sell it, go on tour, sell overpriced merch and tickets etc) works well. This is because for these artists the music companies work like VCs: they put lots of money into different projects and every so often they get a Justin Bieber.
For smaller artists, they are typically working with small labels with barely any marketing budget. This means they sign their value (their music) to a label who often doesn't have the resources to bring the artist up to a higher level.
I believe that for smaller artists, the Creative Commons is the way to go. We did this with Severed Fifth: we grew a community, raised $5000 in funding to record our album, and gave it away for free so others can use it. Our music has appeared in all kinds of music videos on YouTube, in games and elsewhere.
The challenge is for smaller artists who work full time on their music. For weekend warriors like me, money is not that of a deal as I have a job, so giving music away for free is fine. If you are relying on getting paid at a show and need to sell that merch, giving away your music is a big deal, so I understand how some folks are resistant to it.
What type of communication is there between Ubuntu/Canonical and the major PC game developers in regards to promoting more native Linux/.deb version of games? We have a team of people at Canonical who are regularly reaching out to games publishers (e.g. EA) to encourage them to bring their technology to Ubuntu.
I want to develop Free Software and make money out of it. What business models do you suggest so that it can be profitable ? Here are a few models I can think of : make the source available but sell the packaged program ; make the software rely on a service that is not free ; donations ; create closed-source add-ons ; etc. What are your ideas about it, Jono ? Sell it in the Ubuntu Software Center.
Have a donations page on your website.
Sell additional services or materials such as training books, audiobooks, etc.
I think this could make the good stuff happen. :-)
I've been interested in implementing an open source alternative to high end audio studio's software. Has there been any dialog with big publishers (like Steinberg, Avid, Propellerhead, etc) about getting their DAWs crossed over to Linux? Is there any open source project related to audio that has been getting your attention?
Do you see Ubuntu and open software making their move into professional studios? Do you see Ubuntu and open software making their move into professional studios?
Is there any kind of obstacles that open source audio development has faced these this last decade? Is there any open source project related to audio that has been getting your attention? Is there any kind of obstacles that open source audio development has faced these this last decade?
Has there been any dialog with big publishers (like Steinberg, Avid, Propellerhead, etc) about getting their DAWs crossed over to Linux?
Thank you for the answer. :D May the Linux desktop live long and prosper. :) Live long and prosper! :-)
Want to sort me out a summer intern position in your London office? What's that, you do? You're too kind. I am not currently taking any interns. Sorry!
What would be in your opinion the improvements Ubuntu brings to the table compared to other OS (Windows, Mac OS or even Android). Better range of pre-installed software for most users.
What Linux distribution are you running? (Ubuntu?) Secure and virus free experience.
Do you think that major companies feel threatened/insecure with open software, and that is why ATI/nVidia are reluctant to release the libraries for Linux? (at least this was a pain in the ass when I tryed getting the right drivers for my video and sound cards) Free and open, and with a commitment to five years of free security updates for LTSs.
What is your favourite game from the range 2010~2012? Sleek, simple, and elegant user experience.
What is your favorite pokemon? Passionate and friendly community.
Wide range of software in the Ubuntu Software Center.
Strong developer platform.
Etc....
Ubuntu 12.04 for another few weeks until I upgrade to 12.10dev.
I don't think they fear it, I think they just can't justify the investment until they feel the market is bigger.
Not really sure, I am not really a big gamer. :-)
I am not into Pokemon. :-)
Hello, I currently have a home Ubuntu 10.04 server, and I use Lubuntu 12.04 on my Desktop, love them both. I think flavors and derivatives are awesome, and we are very supportive of them. Part of the reason we divide up Ubuntu engineering into Kernel, Foundations, and Desktop is to ensure that the Kernel and Foundations output can be useful for flavors and derivatives too.
I am wondering about what you think about all of the distros that are based on Ubuntu, such as Mint and Pinguy. Does it annoy you that people are moving over to these Ubuntu spinoff's? Or is this just something you expect due to working in the linux community? Our goal here is to build a powerful Free Software platform, and encouraging others to create flavors and derivs is a great feature in building that platform.
What does your job entail as a Community Manager? What does your job entail as a Community Manager? My job is divided into a few different areas. Firstly I build strategy around where we need to build growth and focus on our community (e.g. most recently a strong strategic focus is app developers). Secondly, I manage a team of five community managers who work on different areas (Daniel Holbach (developers), David Planella (app devs / translations), Jorge Castro (cloud), Michael Hall (app devs and upstreams), and Nicholas Skaggs (QA)). Thirdly, I work to ensure Canonical staff members are working with the community and that the values and needs of the community are well served. Finally, I work directly with the community to resolve issues, focus on certain areas, and respond to questions from the community and press.
How often/how long do you spend doing things related to your job? How often/how long do you spend doing things related to your job?
What are your top 5 favourite bands? What are your top 5 favourite bands?
canonical seems to have plowed its own furrow in a number of places: it adopted bzr, then git owned the world. It developed launchpad, but everyone went to github. It threw its lot in with eucalyptus, and then jumped horse to openstack. These examples, upstart, storm, etc. - in general, the open source contributions canonical makes tend to be less than successful compared with other companies. is it bad at managing open source projects, or just bad at marketing them? Each of the technologies you highlighted have been successful, but not neccessarily the most popular. In technology I don't think popularity neccessarily means success. As an example, bzr serves our community really well, so does Launchpad, but I agree it has seen limited wider success. I think Canonical manages Open Source projects well...Ubuntu has been very successful, but I think it boils down to what people want...people want Ubuntu, but in many cases people want git instead of bzr.
i think a few years ago, shuttleworth was saying that canonical was not yet breaking even, but would do - by 2008, then 2010. since then it has started even more projects, in even more markets, hired even more people - presumably that goal is still a ways away. do you look forward to the day when canonical doesn't need to rely on largesse? I am glad we are continuing to invest: we have big, hairy, goals. To achieve them we need growth, focus, and strong teams, and I think we have these. We will break even, but this is a game that needs a lot of upfront investment and passionate people.
Will there be a Bitcoin wallet provided in the Software Center soon? If someone submits it for inclusion then yes! :-)
If anyone is reading this and they have made a wallet, find out how to submit it at Link to developer.ubuntu.com
What's your favorite app in the Software Center? My fave app is the GIMP.
Have you ever met Mark Shuttleworth? Indeed, he was over at my house for a BBQ a few weeks ago.
How is he? I have worked with him since I joined Canonical. He is a cool guy, very technically savvy, with a strong vision, and a strong loyalty to people who are loyal to him. He is very passionate about the community and sits on our Community Council and Technical Board and often gets involved in community matters.
Have you ever negotiated with Valve for bringing steam to Ubuntu/Linux? There has been some discussions.
Any chance of another LugRadio reunion show anytime soon? I've re-played the Devil's Drink segment about a hundred times, still always manages to make me laugh. I would love to do another LugRadio show. We just need to figure out a way of getting the team together, which mainly involved me getting to England to record a show. Maybe we could try a G+ thing sometime. :-)
The accomplishments system is a pretty cool play on the gameification theme, but it is very Ubuntu based. Is there a plan for supporting accomplishments that are totally unrelated to Ubuntu and computing? Absolutely! Right now it is very Ubuntu centric as we are building for what we know, but the system supports accomplishments from other projects too. If someone wants to build an Accomplishments Collection for Fedora, FreeBSD, or whatever, the system supports it. You can read more about creating accomplishments at Link to wiki.ubuntu.com
The only piece of the core system that is very Ubuntu specific is that it uses Ubuntu One. If someone wants to submit a branch to support other backends we would be happy to review. :-)
Jono, what was the fate of Ubuntu's "Four Horsemen" since you guys hired a fifth member of the team? Are you guys now officially called the Five Horsemen? These are the questions that keep Ubuntu redditors awake at night. We are now the six horsemen. :-)
My Question is if the ubuntu developers are thinking in integrating this feature on future versions of Unity? My Question is if the ubuntu developers are thinking in integrating this feature on future versions of Unity?
I would pay to listen again Lugradio or Shot of Jaq and I don't think I'm the only one. Have you ever thought about making money with a podcast? I would pay to listen again Lugradio or Shot of Jaq and I don't think I'm the only one. Have you ever thought about making money with a podcast?
I guess you would love to see available on the Ubuntu Software Center mainstream popular games even if they have DRM and some other important applications like Photoshop, Autocad and etc... But if we fill the desktop with a lot of these things at the end what would be the difference between an Ubuntu desktop and a OSX desktop? Don't you think that open source should create open alternatives and try a different approach? I guess you would love to see available on the Ubuntu Software Center mainstream popular games even if they have DRM and some other important applications like Photoshop, Autocad and etc... But if we fill the desktop with a lot of these things at the end what would be the difference between an Ubuntu desktop and a OSX desktop? Don't you think that open source should create open alternatives and try a different approach?
Lets try again. Unity had terrible reviews. Why did Canonical not listen to their users about the introduction of this? You have to admit, it was a pretty bad reception. Canonical's response to this was similar to RIM's response about poor innovation, or the complete lack of it. They ignored it. That's better, thanks for presenting your question more politely.
When we introduced Unity we knew that chunks of it needed more sheening and refinement. What was important to us was to ensure that Unity was in good shape for Ubuntu 12.04, our next LTS, this is why we dropped in a few releases early to give our users a chance to play with it, share their experiences, share their concerns, and give us a chance to fix these outstanding problems.
Now, as you say, some folks were not happy with Unity. I think part of this was that those early Unity releases has a pretty tiny amount of QA applied: they were crashy, and when Unity crashed, it would take compiz down with it too. To remedy this we built an automated testing lab, and hired someone on my team to build a community of manual testers. I think most would agree that the Unity in 12.04 is much higher quality.
When we introduced Unity originally some folks just didn't like the design. This is always tough: design is emotional, and so is change, so a change with a new design is really emotional. Now some of the feedback at this time was constructive: it highlighted specific deficiencies in the design, problems in the implementation and other things. The design and engineering teams read all of this feedback with interest and reacted to much of it in future releases.
Some folks just didn't like Unity for the fact it was "different" and "why didn't you guys just keep shipping GNOME 2". For us to bring Free Software to more and more people we need to constantly evolve, and Unity was a step along that evolution. We have expanded our target demographic to not just Linux enthusiasts but general consumers too, and we found that GNOME 2 did not serve general consumers as well...as such Unity was designed to bridge that gap.
Now, of course, Unity is not perfect. There is still lots of work to be done, and many improvements to be made, but I think we are on the right track.
One thing I can assure you is that Canonical did not ignore this feedback: quite the opposite, but we did focus on the constructive feedback as opposed to the rantings on social media networks. Ubuntu is a shared project, our community is an integral part of the project, but we have to have a platform of respect and collaboration to do good work...and this is why we focused on the feedback from those who wanted to engage as opposed to yell.
I hope this answers your question. :-)
It's closely related to my major and my career plans, so I'm really curious what goes into it and what kind of surprises I might find myself confronting down the road. I think many new community managers don't build enough strategy into the plans. They have generalized plans around "growth" and "awareness". If you are working professionally for a company, this lack of meat on the bone doesn't give the company or the community enough assurances around the work.
Do you have someone on your team that is focussed on the business desktop users community? Today, not really. Our primary focus is on the collaborative contributor community. This is changing as we focus more and more on user communities (e.g. the app dev community who only want to use Ubuntu as a platform).
2) For those of us looking to contribute to Ubuntu (that have not done so in the past) what areas is the OS lacking, or what areas could we best contribute our skills? I think we need more and more folks helping with LoCo Teams (Link to loco.ubuntu.com and Documentation. We could always use hands on deck there!
Will we ever be able to run DRM protected Silverlight apps like Netflix, or SkyGo? It's pretty much the only thing I can't do on Ubuntu. I would love if we could have Netflix, but it depends on if Netflix are willing to make a Linux client.
I feel you're making a really big mistake here: Pursuing a new demographic while ignoring your core. We are not ignore Linux enthusiasts...we are just not focusing purely on them. Some people presume that just because we don't have everything that a Linux enthusiast needs we are "ignoring" them. We want to build a system for everyone, and that requires a delicate balance.
As I said earlier, for a novice user if we include too much configurabilty that doesn't make sense or is not properly designed, user testing shows that it makes Ubuntu less useful. Technically savvy people can install and add additional configurability where desired. This is why I think it is better to have a simple Unity by default and then allow people to tune and tweak it with additional tools like MyUnity where needed. This way you get the best of both worlds: a simple out of the box experience, yet Linux enthusiasts can hotrod their system to get more if they want.
Any chance of another album any soon? Also, just wanted so say thanks for all the work you in the band and the Ubuntu community. We are currently writing a new Severed Fifth album. I am also thinking of recording an acoustic album for charity.
What can we expect for the future of raspberry pi and ubuntu? I am not really sure. I have not been particularly involved in the discussions with the Raspberry Pi folks: I would love to see Ubuntu running on there.
As a Python developer I would like to ask how the Python 3 integration as the standard version with the next release (12.10) is going? Also, thanks for Ubuntu, just love it for work and personal use and Unity makes it all a joy now. :) To be honest, I am not sure how the Python 3 has progressed thus far...I know it is a core release goal, so it should go pretty well. :-)
Tits or ass? You said any question.... I like all animals, not just Blue Tits and Donkeys.
As a English Ex-Pat Do you have things other than BBQ'ing you are trying to get into the swing of? Perhaps home brewing? I would love to brew some beer. I worry about creating an ultra-death-brew though and losing a weekend. :-)
Is Canonical accepting interns at all, and if so how can I get to know more? Is Canonical accepting interns at all, and if so how can I get to know more?
Aren't you heartily sick of every public discussion you take part in getting hijacked by the small, but excessively vocal, minority of people of just can't deal with people doing some actual work to try and improve the Linux desktop experience (i.e Unity) and prepared to do anything active about their own problems? Aren't you heartily sick of every public discussion you take part in getting hijacked by the small, but excessively vocal, minority of people of just can't deal with people doing some actual work to try and improve the Linux desktop experience (i.e Unity) and prepared to do anything active about their own problems? There is definitely a vocal minority, but my take on this has been that every opinion and critique is fair so long as it is respectful, accurate, and preferably in the interests of finding a solution. Some folks have tried Ubuntu 12.04 and still don't like Unity and have a list of reasons why, and they fairly and respectfully share those views: that kind of discourse is wonderful...it helps us improve.
Did you pick the band for UDS-Q? They were awesome. Did you pick the band for UDS-Q? They were awesome.
Unity from a year ago ... ignore these people. If Unity a year ago was so bad that you're ignoring the early adopters who got burned by it, why on earth did you let it out the door? Why should they trust you now? Software is never "done", you have to release early and release often; that is at the core of how Open Source works.
"Unity" means − among other things − "the same interface for Desktops, TV, phones, tablets, cars". Have you put any thoughts in Home Automation interfaces, which I think can become a big thing in the future ? While not a core focus of the Unity team right now, I would love to see a community derivative Ubuntu distribution for home automation. I think it could be awesome. :-)
What advice can you give to someone who is new to the field of Community Management? Without wishing to push my book, I think it will be helpful for you. Just make sure you get the new 2nd Edition: there is lots of other good content in there.
My advice for getting started is to study the work of other community managers, and listen and learn from their experience. Community management is a skill that is passed on between different people, and that kind of observational work is useful in seeing patterns and approaches to the profession.
Is the 2nd edition available as an e-book? Yep! :-)
Will you be dressing up as a spherical cow for halloween? Because I'm having a damned hard time finding a quetzal costume. Srsly. :) LOL! I hope so!
Will you be coming to Ground Kontrol after the Puppet Labs party this year, and if so, will we have to physically carry you back across the river? You don't have a keynote this year, so no excuses. :P. I can try. :-)
Any plans to provide funding/grants to the LoCo teams to help them organize events or for doing what they do? Outside of our current funding, I am not sure we will be able to commit to further funding. What I would love to see is LoCo Teams supporting themselves more and more with Kickstarter campaigns and donations drives to help cover any other expenses. :-)
Are there any plans to introduce the minimizing of apps by clicking or holding their icon in the launcher? What is wrong with the minimize button? :-)
Also, are there any plans to make the dash more efficient in finding apps, files, music etc.? The design team are constantly working to improve search and findability, and I think you will see some improvements in the 12.10 cycle in this area.
Hi, recently I bought a samsung series 5 ultrabook and tried to install ubuntu on it. I discovered I couldn't. Is this some king of boycott or the problem is me? Greetings from Brazil. No idea: it should install fine. Was there a software error?
Checked to make sure you had a beard. Not disappointed. LOL!
'Did my first parachute jump' is exactly the sort of thing I was aiming at with the question, human verified accomplishements, perhaps with geo-tagged photo proof. Part of the original plan was to have human-awarded accomplishments. The classic use case we have here is something such as an Ubuntu contributor wanting to thank someone for some great work that cannot be auto-detected with the current system. We would give them the ability to award a trophy to this person so it appears in their My Trophies view.
For your parachute jump example, we could potentially set up a system where a set of people can issue trophies when they see proof of something. For example, you send someone a photo of you doing the jump and then they award the trophy.
This would be great for bucket lists (e.g. visiting a set of landmarks) and then getting trophies for each one you visit.
It is all possible, we just need more hands on deck to write the code. :-)
My uncle has ubuntu on his 3rd and 4th computers. I like to call his little son "ubuntu" Lols were had. Awesome!
Last updated: 2012-06-09 23:45 UTC
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Raspberry Pi Bitcoin Mining For 12 Hours! How to Mine for Bitcoin with a Raspberry Pi - Part 1 of 2 Create a Bitcoin Wallet on a Raspberry Pi Raspberry Pi 3+ Bitcoin Mining (Bitmain AntMiner U3) Bitcoin Miner Setup : Raspberry Pi

Raspberry Pi OS (previously called Raspbian) is our official operating system for all models of the Raspberry Pi.. Use Raspberry Pi Imager for an easy way to install Raspberry Pi OS and other operating systems to an SD card ready to use with your Raspberry Pi:. Raspberry Pi Imager for Windows; Raspberry Pi Imager for macOS; Raspberry Pi Imager for Ubuntu Install Bitcoin Core on the Raspberry Pi 3/B+. sudo apt-add-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin; sudo apt-get update; sudo apt-get install bitcoind; After running the aforementioned commands, you must configure your router for port-forwarding at your Raspberry Pi local-IP address- to that run, ifconfig -a. If you want to run a full node on the Bitcoin network, you might want to do so on a computer that doesn’t use so much power and is very inexpensive. The Raspberry Pi is an obvious choice for that. Here’s a tutorial on how to install the newest version ofBitcoin Core on the Raspbian OS, which is based on the Debian GNU/Linux distribution. If Bitcoin is a free open source peer-to-peer electronic cash system that is completely decentralized, without the need for a central server or trusted parties. Users hold the crypto keys to their own money and transact directly with each other, with the help of a P2P network to check for double-spending. Note for future bitcoin upgrades: Here we're basically changing the bitcoin Dockerfile to use the bitcoin image compatible with Raspberry Pi 4 instead of the Desktop compatible version in the default Dockerfile. The above is for Bitcoin v0.18.1. For future bitcoin upgrades, here's how you can find which filename & hash to put in there:

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Raspberry Pi Bitcoin Mining For 12 Hours!

Hey Everyone! This is a tutorial on how to setup a fully functioning bitcoin miner using a Raspberry pi. Raspberry pi's are extremely useful for programming and for bitcoin mining. Enjoy. Alexander J. Singleton provides a screencast for Raspberry Pi set-up and configuration introducing Bitcoin-mining as part-1 of a 2-series tutorial- please refer to the following GitHub-gist for ... In this video I show you how to create a bitcoin wallet on a raspberry pi ... Installing the Electrum Bitcoin in Debian 9 (Stretch) - Duration: 12:55. Rex Kneisley 1,977 views. Make Your Own 15.6" Full HD Screen for 32 bucks for use with Raspberry Pi, DSLR, Video camera - Duration: 12:00. Alex Eames 799,549 views DIY Bitcoin Lottery with a Raspberry Pi - Duration: 7:33. SeanHodgins 35,864 views. 7:33. Build a Desktop Arcade Machine with Raspberry Pi 3 and Retropie: Super Turbo Pro Edition - Duration: 27:15.

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